What social media means and lingo for it at the Scottsdale airpark

Nebulous Nomenclature

One of the biggest challenges we face in our industry today is coming up with terms to describe what we do using terms that that everyone understands. Recommending that a client engage in social media is often too vague and substituting “start a Facebook page” in its place can be too specific and irrelevant.  We’re currently scripting video that will showcase our 360⁰ Multi-Media Marketing Plan.  We have created a simple process for developing measurable campaigns that are manifest on the “Web”.  Whenever we go to lock down the script we end up haggling over terms.  So, today we’re asking for your help in creating some standards.  Take a look at the list and let us know the terms you use and prefer to describe what you do.

Are we working on “the Web” or “the Internet”?

What is new media, traditional media, digital media, analog media, rich or robust media?

Is it dynamic content, static content, a robust interface, social media, post, blog, interactive Website, static Website?

When it comes to social media do you Twitter, Tweet, Blog or Post?

When it comes to your community, what’s better: friends, likes, followers (stalkers!?) subscribers, commenters, recommendations, hotlinks or pingbacks?

Where is it best to direct your traffic: URLs, domain names, home page, splash page, landing page, index page, subpage, Facebook page, Twitter page,.  Do you Twitter Tweet, Post or Blog?
What’s in this post for you?  The comfort that comes from knowing that we’re as confused as you are when it comes to the terminology being tossed around the digital communications world. Also, we may actually start a discussion that leads to a consensus regarding these terms.

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